Five Things a Logo Designer Should Understand

Five Things a Logo Designer Should Understand

I have finally decided to expand my food business and thought about investing a bit on branding. I asked my husband about his insights on this and he told me that in order for my product to be recognized, one essential step that I should take is to create a logo for my business. According to him, having a logo means establishing an identity through which my products would be known for.

He further added that one good example is that game called logo quiz wherein you get to guess the logo. He explained that given the long list of logo products included there, it’s amazing how a lot of people can actually recognize one from the other. That being so means that these companies have been successful in their goal as to why they have adapted each logo: they want the logo to be instantly associated with their products.

He advised me to go online as there’s surely a lot of experts willing to help me with the logo, and true enough a good number responded to my post. From the list, I decided to hire one which offered the most reasonable price. I explained to him what my business was all about and the logo concept which I wished to have. I was so happy with the design that I asked the specialist about how he came up with the design and from my perspective.

Here is what every logo designer should understand

1. Be Patient.

The designer/artist I hired was very patient. He paid attention to all the details I requested and even explained to me the process of designing the logo in a less technical way. He was not bothered (or maybe he just didn’t show it) with the minute alterations I requested from him from time to time. According to him, he acknowledges very well that if his clients knew how to do things which they sought service for, they wouldn’t be hiring specialists like him in the first place.

2. Know the Nature of the Product

For me, this is one trait that every designer should possess. I was into food business, more specifically pastry so the web designer created one with details related to baking and sweets. Understanding what the product is all about would guide the designer as to which elements are welcome in the logo concept and which are irrelevant. In addition, this would also help in choosing the colors. For example, a lot of dark colors wouldn’t be appropriate for a children’s party-related business.

3. Keep it simple.

A simple, well-coordinated logo is easier to recognize compared to one with a lot of details that do not seem to be connected. For mine, I requested that the name of my product should be clearly visible even with some other details present in the logo. And he delivered such request.

4. Make Suggestions

Although I gave specific instructions to the web designer, I was very glad that he was bold enough to express his personal suggestions in a very respectful manner. I wanted a bit of an artsy font for my logo but he told me that a more straigh forward on might be more appropirate if I wanted visibility and I wanted to leave an impression to my buyers.

5. Meet the Deadline

In my job posting, I clearly stated that the design had to be finished in three days as I needed to have the printed for the launching. I knew it was quite a short amount of time but since we agreed on it, the designer had everything readied right on schedule. And for that, I gave him a bonus.

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